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Let’s start the new year off with some New Year’s-themed episodes. First off, the stars of Fibber McGee and Molly are thrilled to be invited to the New Year’s Eve dance at the highfalutin Wistful Vista Country Club. They’ll be mixing with “society so high your nose will bleed.” Then jump forward a couple of days to the first episode of Information Please from 1939. The panelists will be quizzed about the previous year’s events, and they’ll have to untangle a very tricky poem. Grab it here.

Very proud to be be returning to e- (and paper) magazine Tales from the Canyons of the Damned. This time there's an all-space issue. Yes, it's Tales from the Canyons of the Damned INNNN SPAAAAACE. My story, "The Peacemaker," is about Ambassador Moab Wintner. He's a lot more “realpolitik” than, say, someone you might meet in Starfleet. He’s not above trickery to ensure his Galactic Coalition gets what it wants and peace is maintained. Available in Kindle and paper format here.

For our second Christmas-themed episode this year, we move from Christmas into New Year’s. We start off with Eve Arden in Our Miss Brooks. It’s Christmas Eve, and Connie seems destined to spend it alone (if you don’t count her pathetic little Christmas tree), but what would a Christmas comedy be without a little miracle? Then it’s time to Meet Me at Parky’s, where that congenial Greek restaurateur, Parky himself, will spend the end of December looking for tickets to the New Year’s Day Rose Bowl game in Pasadena. If he can get any, that will be a miracle as well. Get your cheer here.

For Your Consideration - "Box 27"

This year, I had only one story published, but I'm very proud of it. Nature is the world's preeminent scientific journal. It also publishes 900-word science fiction stories on the last page of each weekly issue in their "Futures" section.

My story, "Box 27," is about the Earth ambassador trying to take care of the last bit of paperwork before we join the Galactic Confederation. It's light-hearted and amusing. It was inspired by a brief moment in Carl Sagan's Cosmos. At the end of the story there's a link to a blog post I did about what inspired my story. Read it here.

For our first Christmas-themed episode this year, we present the Lux Radio Theatre adaptation of the Judy Garland classic, Meet Me in St. Louis. This one-hour version drops the character of Agnes, but retains, in the roles they originated in the 1944 film, Judy Garland and Margaret O’Brien as sisters Esther and Tootie Smith, as well as Tom Drake as The Boy Next Door, John Truett. And you get to hear Garland perform a few songs that have since become standards, “The Boy Next Door,” “The Trolley Song,” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” Check it out here.

For Thanksgiving, we present two Turkey Day-themed comedies. First up, on The Jack Benny Show, Mary reads a poem she wrote just for 1939. From 1939 to 1941, Thanksgiving was celebrated not on the fourth Thursday of the month, but the third. Then Jack wonders what’s going on when the turkey he bought lays an egg as big as a cantaloupe. The Great Gildersleeve was always filled with topical laughs. As Thanksgiving approaches, Gildy hopes to get a coveted “B Ration” gas card, nephew Leroy has to perform in the school Thanksgiving play, and it becomes harder and harder to actually find a turkey.

Give a listen here.

Read my latest story for free at NATURE

Nature is the world's preeminent scientific journal. It also publishes science fiction. The last page of each weekly issue is the "Futures" section, with a short (800 - 950 word) story. Norman Spinrad has written for them, as well as Alex Shvartsman, and my friend and editor Gerri Leen.


My story, "Box 27," is about the Earth ambassador trying to take care of the last bit of paperwork before we join the Galactic Confederation. It's light-hearted and amusing. It was inspired by a brief moment in Carl Sagan's Cosmos. At the end of the story there's a link to a blog post I did about what inspired my story. Read it here.

With the World Series almost upon us, we thought we’d give you a tale of baseball that culminates at the World Series. The Lux Radio Theater brought listeners abridged versions of popular films of the day. This time it’s It Happens Every Spring, with Ray Miland reprising the role he created in the 1949 film of the same name. Miland plays a mild-mannered college professor who stumbles up on wood repellent. When secretly applied to baseballs, it makes him a pitcher that no one can hit. Play ball! Check it out here.

We think of Ray Bradbury as a fantasist or a science fiction writer. But he was equally adept at crime drama. One of his first sales was “Killer Come Back to Me” to Detective Tales in July of 1944. Less than two years later, it was adapted for the radio by the Molle Mystery Theatre. This hard-boiled noir tale of killers, dames, and stolen identities takes a number of clever twists and turns. But does crime ever pay? Then on Meet Me At Parky’s, everyone’s favorite Greek restauranteur decides to help out with a teacher shortage. He may be known for his malapropisms in English, but if he’s going to teach his native Greek nothing could possibly go wrong, right? Check it out here.

Temple of Bad: The Vampire's Coffin

THE VAMPIRE’S COFFIN is a Mexican (Spanish-language) horror film with all the attendant silliness. It's also possibly the best-filmed movie we've ever reviewed. How can this be? The man behind the camera has a lot more skill than anyone in front of it.

Check it out here.